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Circuits

Introduction

The Circuits Section offers the capability to track Circuits (cairs.net defines a circuit as any communication service that does not produce a dial tone) and their related segments. Circuits include items such as: (1) computer circuits, (2) data circuits, (3) fire alarms, (4) burglar alarms, (5) signaling circuits, (6) radio loops, and other forms of signal transmission. 

A circuit may have more than one related circuit part and circuit parts have many different names including: (1) segments, (2) legs, and (3) drops.  Cairs.net refers to all these parts as circuit "segments” to simplify the terminology.  Cairs.net also uses the terms connections and paths for Circuits or segments to indicate the transmission of a signal. A signal provides information regarding what action occurred, where the action occurred, or what set off a specific alarm as programmed at your location.

In the Circuits Section, you have the capability to add main Circuits with their associated segments as well as track the necessary information for all your Circuits. Examples of necessary information include: (1) site, (2) building, (3) connections, (4) paths, (5) alternate names, and (6) equipment information. All this information is required to determine the identity and location of any alarm or signal.

 

Note: Cairs.net will always treat the circuit in the following manner:

One Path Circuit -Transmit: a circuit using one wire path to send information from one end to another is referred to as the "Transmit Path”.

Two Path Circuit - Receive: a circuit using two wires paths is a "Transmit and Receive" circuit.  The first path of wires transmits and the second path receives.  Cairs.net always considers the first path the "Transmit" path.

Three Path Circuit - Control: a three-path circuit is a combination of transmit and receive paths, plus a third path of wires used for a "Control" path.  For this type of circuit, the first path transmits, the second path receives, and the third is the control path.

Four Path Circuit: a four-path circuit is a combination of transmit and receive paths, plus a third and fourth path used as the first and second "Control" paths.

 

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